ocean travel

A wide sea voyage severs us at once. It makes us conscious of being cast loose from the secure anchorage of settled life, and sent adrift upon a doubtful world.

Washington Irving

One of Washington Irving’s reflections when bound for Paris in the 1830s.  From David McCullough’s “A Greater Journey”:

“…Washington Irving, describing his own first crossing of the Atlantic, made the point that in travel by land there was always a kind of “continuity of scene” that gave one a feeling of being connected still to home. “But a wide sea voyage severs us at once.  It makes us conscious of being cast loose from the secure anchorage of settled life, and sent adrift upon a doubtful world.  It interposes a gulf not merely imaginary, but real between us and our homes–a gulf subjected to tempest and fear and uncertainty, rendering distance palpable, and return precarious.””